Playing the Part.

Almost a year now, and for some infernal reason I’d not been to the city’s exclusive Whisky Society until last night. With a fond thanks to seolta for knowing all the right people, and to angledge for being my unparalleled American mirror, we got a bit gussied up and headed out to ‘the Club, dahling’ for an evening of provocative conversation and tantalizing sensory indulgence. My gods, can we please do this once a week?

The building is a converted warehouse from 1785, the furnishings within inviting and comfortable. Wood-paneling, overstuffed chairs, massive fireplaces, and hundreds upon hundreds of whiskies. Free coffee and tea, a crafty little nosing kit to test your olfactory mettle, platters of cheese and grapes, and a single perfect Mehari to put a cap on the experience. Click that guy on the bottom. He’s my boy.

I’d never had a 38-year old malt before, but damn it all – I will again, and hopefully always relish that taste as much as the first time. And the snapshot of just being there with these people and enjoying a seemingly endless barrage of tastes, smells, and total ambiance…sometimes the simplest social rituals are the most rewarding. But by now you know that I’m a sucker for carrying on quaint tradition and the delight of the senses. And last night I was a whore, baby.

How wonderful that I was led to this place. And then candles, and incense, and stories read aloud while huddled beneath tartan and chenille.

And there will be more nights like these, hopefully soon with pictures of the Meeting Room, because though the perfect stills on the above Society site are quite illustrative, there can be more accurate representations crafted to convey the den-like countenance of the event, and the magical evocation of the essence of Contentedness. And the very nature of Perfect. These are the things that turn me on.

18 Responses to “Playing the Part.”

  1. angledge Says:
    July 3rd, 2004 at 10:32 am

    My gods, can we please do this once a week?
    Deal!
    Especially storytime. I didn't realize how much I missed stories out loud until I was listening.

  2. spiffington Says:
    July 3rd, 2004 at 8:50 pm

    …and he is the best at reading stories too. You really feel like you're a part of the stories 🙂

  3. FunkyPlaid Says:
    July 4th, 2004 at 1:57 am

    🙂
    Just imagine if I sounded like Barry White. I could make millons…

  4. FunkyPlaid Says:
    July 4th, 2004 at 1:56 am

    You got it. As often as you like. Or until my vocal chords break off and wither away.
    🙂

  5. spiffington Says:
    July 4th, 2004 at 2:25 am

    I know this message is for Ange really but…
    Hooray! More tales!
    I'd like to be a storytime dweller too, if I'm allowed?
    They make me all happy and cosy 🙂

  6. zotz Says:
    July 3rd, 2004 at 10:49 am

    I was readin Ken McLeod's blog and he made a reference to a book called Discovering the Scottish Revolution 1692-1746. Of course, while reading his entries I was thinking of you. His summary and comments are in the June 11th and 15th entries, here. Possibly of interest.
    2001 and all that, the second entry here, is also worth a look, although not what you'd call related.

  7. FunkyPlaid Says:
    July 4th, 2004 at 2:16 am

    Oh, thanks for thinking of me, G!
    I had a bash at Ken's thoughts, and while I love the Star Trek school of naming revolutionary mechanisms, I'm not sure if by his description I would appreciate Davidson's book. If Ken is reading at as intended, there are some generalizations that should have been thrown out in the 60s, if not before. I'm not going to bore you with it here, but suffice to say that it was Edinburgh – not Scotland – that was considered the new Athens, and most of the perspectives conveyed on the country are distinctly British views, though I don't know Davidson's context or background. And, of course, the counter-revolutionaries that he speaks of are actually the counter-counter-revolutionaries, but we're not counting here. 🙂
    Again, thanks so much for this link!

  8. zotz Says:
    July 4th, 2004 at 5:31 am

    Sounds interesting. I may ask you to expand, if I see you while you're likely to still remember.
    Cheers.

  9. FunkyPlaid Says:
    July 4th, 2004 at 6:55 pm

    Man, if you're willing to listen to my waffle, than I'm willing to expound. 🙂
    We're overdue for a drink, in any event. You around this coming weekend or early next week?

  10. zotz Says:
    July 4th, 2004 at 7:05 pm

    Man, if you're willing to listen to my waffle, than I'm willing to expound. 🙂
    Excellent. That's what I like to hear.
    You around this coming weekend or early next week?
    Oh yes. I need to get a ticket for a gig on Wednesday, but apart from that I'm definitely about.

  11. dichroicynosure Says:
    July 3rd, 2004 at 1:15 pm

    to sacralise the mundane
    I love your mixing of decadence with the earthiness of the Scottish rites, you elevate it like a true aesthetic–was there ever as Scottish flaneur?
    We are indeed on the same page here–I tend to "ritualise/gourmetise the fish balls, cracker bread, & potato lomper" here ; )

  12. FunkyPlaid Says:
    July 4th, 2004 at 2:00 am

    Re: to sacralise the mundane
    I didn't know fish even *had* balls… 🙂
    It is a true aesthetic, I believe. There is too much input and sensory extension there not to raise it up so high. I know you feel me, here.
    And besides, could we ever to anything idly?

  13. lilitufire Says:
    July 3rd, 2004 at 10:43 pm

    Oh, I want to go to that, too – I keep on bugging <lj user="kisin"> to take me, but it's not been working. I might have to make this a Summer Plan TM 🙂

  14. aitkendrum Says:
    July 4th, 2004 at 5:23 am

    Whisky and Dunsany
    You have my envy my friend, not only for the trip to the Society and the fine stories you imparted but the very simple fact you ended up with two women upon your bed, all in the best possible taste of course!.
    Alas the demon of sleep took me away from the Ships and Sea.
    Perhaps next time

  15. FunkyPlaid Says:
    July 5th, 2004 at 4:25 am

    Re: Whisky and Dunsany
    Two women (or more) does not a restful night make. Besides, what kind of man would I be were I to lure them in by the bedful with dark, dank stories of old…without kicking their arses out into the cold once my selfish literary needs were fulfilled?
    Do you think I'm a cad?
    🙂
    Beware the chips that the king of the gnomes so wickedly fries…

  16. noire_blanche Says:
    July 4th, 2004 at 9:40 pm

    Ahh, your words project the very atmosphere into my mind perfectly. Thanks so much for sharing this experience, so I can live vicariously. : D
    I too have a soft spot for tradition, ritual and (secret) societies. Centuries old, yet distanced from the passing of time altogether. Evenings spent among woodpanelled oxblood walls and chesterfield sofas stimulating each of the senses as well as the mind are alluring and enchanting.
    Looking forward to your own pictures from these more than stimulating evenings. May you enjoy many more of these and please, do share. : )

  17. FunkyPlaid Says:
    July 5th, 2004 at 6:50 pm

    Centuries old, yet distanced from the passing of time altogether. Evenings spent among woodpanelled oxblood walls and chesterfield sofas stimulating each of the senses as well as the mind are alluring and enchanting.
    Oh, you get it, you get it!
    I'll bet you have some simply decadent experiences from the region in which you reside; it, too, is steeped in such things, and the pull is sometimes undeniable. It would be interesting to compare and contrast the cultural differences in these respective leisure-time traditions…I'll bet we'd find them strikingly similar.
    Shows you what dandies and alcoholics we all are, throughout the world. 🙂

  18. aitkendrum Says:
    July 5th, 2004 at 6:46 am

    Re: Whisky and Dunsany
    Certainly not a cad or a bounder, Sir but definitely a slight rougish look in the eyes…

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