At It Again.

Looks like ol’ Hugh Cheape is Mythbustin’ again, which is what we’ve come to know and love about him, among other things. One of the kinder, more helpful historians out there, always on the forefront of cultural sleuthing and diverse corpus-building. I think if I could choose one scholar’s portfolio to ingest that would represent Scotland as a whole, it would be his.

I’m certainly not a hanger-on in supporting Balmoralization, et al., but this was a morsel I had not considered; wouldn’t have believed it totally if it weren’t Hugh speaking up. Looking forward to the book!

AyePod

5 Responses to “At It Again.”

  1. zotz Says:
    April 21st, 2008 at 10:16 am

    Interestingly incoherent article. The idea of pipers at funerals is wrong . . . except that pipes were played and pipers were patronised. The highland pipes were invented around 1800, except that pipes were played in the highlands before that.
    I also would quite like to see the book. Presumably it'll spell out roughly how much pipes and piping changed around then (quite a bit, by the sound of it) rather than trying to speak in headlines. It sounds very interesting.

  2. niddrie_edge Says:
    April 21st, 2008 at 2:18 pm

    Ah here we are at the blurred edges, the coastal fringes.
    I like that Victorian seal of approval. Reminds me of something a friend said after reading Black Athena. Some nonsense about how the Northern Germanics reinforced their Apollonian control by getting the heirarchical head to utter the memes which would dissipate a culture.
    I am also reminded of an entry I made about the Statutes of Iona and which also makes passing reference to a lost radio show by Robbie The Pict called "In the Footsteps of Calgacus", where Robbie declares the man may be a "personification of principles".
    How much has Walter Scott to do with these items you refer to? Also what about that Carnyx!
    Eek! You made me read The Telegraph!

  3. scotis_man Says:
    April 21st, 2008 at 8:34 pm

    Having had a glimpse into the history of the pipes, and seen some early drawings of pipers when looking for the origin of the kilt, I can accept that what we see in pipe bands today came from the 1800s as did the modern kilt, etc. I will say that there is a fair amount of evidence of pipes of some sort fairly far back.
    I will also look forward to the book.

  4. Anonymous Says:
    May 4th, 2008 at 12:16 am

    1) Love the cartoon!
    2) While trying to find the article (don't have Acrobat so had to Google for it rather than read a .pdf) I came across several forum discussions with people who said basically that the book itself is probably great but the various newsmongers had sensationalized the story to make headlines, in the sense that a lot of what Cheape actually says is not as revolutionary as the news made it out to be.
    3) What does Chris Caswell have to say?
    –Kirsty

  5. Anonymous Says:
    May 4th, 2008 at 12:35 am

    1) Love the cartoon!
    2) While trying to find the article (don't have Acrobat so had to Google for it rather than read a .pdf) I came across several forum discussions with people who said basically that the book itself is probably great but the various newsmongers had sensationalized the story to make headlines, in the sense that a lot of what Cheape actually says is not as revolutionary as the news made it out to be.
    3) What does Chris Caswell have to say?
    –Kirsty

Leave a Reply